Tag Archives: release

Our Android 2.0 App Release & Testimonial Winners Announced Wednesday

Because of the enormous response we received during last week’s testimonial-100GB giveaway, the five winners will be announced on Wednesday instead of today. Thanks again to everyone who participated! We were so grateful for all of the positive feedback.

If you missed it, we wanted to draw special attention to our new open-source HTML5 Android app that went live last week. Here is Ars Technica’s write up about it, or you can read the June 11 press release:

SpiderOak Launches Open-Source HTML5 Android App

Functions Like a Native App, Provides the Foundation for Enterprise-Grade, ‘Zero-Knowledge’ Mobile Apps

SAN FRANCISCO, CA–(Marketwired – Jun 11, 2013) - SpiderOak, the ‘Zero-Knowledge’ privacy cloud technologies provider, today announced the new SpiderOak Android 2.0 application. Redesigned from the ground up using HTML5 and fully compatible with the brand-new SpiderOak Hive, the Android app is setting the standard for mobile privacy in the cloud. The newly available app enables users to view the data located in the Hive folder as well as any folders or files across their SpiderOak devices. It sets a new precedent for the development of open-source, HTML5 mobile applications.

“Our new Android app bucks the prevailing trends,” said Ethan Oberman, CEO of SpiderOak. “We have proven the capabilities of HTML5 and the success of producing open source mobile software. Our Android 2.0 app further sets the groundwork for bringing full ‘Zero-Knowledge’ read/write to mobile devices — leveraging our new Crypton framework. After all, privacy must expand beyond the computer to include the rapidly evolving mobile platform.”

HTML5 and Open Source

SpiderOak has a strong commitment to open source software and expounds on this belief with SpiderOak Mobile 2.0. The company also believes in leveraging the HTML5 platform as a viable solution to building mobile apps, despite recent companies moving in the other direction — most notably Facebook.

Newly hired lead mobile developer Tommy-Carlos Williams is a renowned expert in HTML5 and PhoneGap, an industry-leading open-source framework for developing apps using HTML5. “With SpiderOak 2.0 for Android, we’re really leveraging the HTML5 platform in its truest nature,” said Williams. “I’m excited at the direction SpiderOak is taking in mobile. We’re breaking new ground for ‘Zero-Knowledge’ privacy, as well as for the evolution of HTML5 itself. It is for these reasons I moved to SpiderOak and look forward to continuing our progress in these areas and more.”

SpiderOak applied styling to make the new app match Android 4.0 and above, and has devised features that behave in a native manner. The goal of the new app is not just to increase overall functionality and usability, but also appeal to the more stringent privacy and security demands of the enterprise.

Designed for Simplicity and Ease of Use

SpiderOak 2.0 for Android also includes significant usability enhancements, such as a higher level of app performance and easier navigation. Through the updated Android app, users can log in and easily see the data in their Hive folder or across any other device that is running SpiderOak. In addition to immediately accessing and viewing all of the data inside an account, a user can download and share files via email or social media.

Devices running Android 2.3 and newer versions can download the app in the Google Play Store.

To learn more about SpiderOak Hive, please visit: https://spideroak.com/hive/

NEW FEATURE: What would you call it?

Saying this is an exciting time at SpiderOak is an understatement. There are so many wonderful things happening. One of which is a major release, Version 5.0, coming in the next few weeks. This release will include many fixes as well as a couple additional features. Stay tuned for posts about these fixes and features.

As for now, I’ll let you in on one of these new features in exchange for some of your creative juices. Deal?

We are keeping our highly customizable sync features for advanced users, while simultaneously adopting the ‘industry standard’ central sync/backup folder spearheaded by Dropbox. This new folder makes it easier for new users to get started without having to select items to backup or sync. Items placed into this folder will be uploaded to SpiderOak and then pushed out to any other place this folder exists. Additionally, this folder will be available via the newly designed mobile app.

Here’s an example. Upon downloading the new SpiderOak application on your Mac, you will find this new folder in the Finder window under ‘Favorites’. You can then drag and drop documents, pictures or whatever you desire, into that folder. These items will start to upload immediately.

On your Windows machine, you will notice the new folder located in the Documents folder in Explorer, and easy reachable through favorites and a desktop shortcut. When opening up this new folder, you will see all the items you placed into this folder on any of your other devices. As you then place items from your Windows machine into this folder, they will in turn be available in the folder on across your network.

This new functionality will also be available in Linux as well as accessible through our newly redesigned and soon to be released mobile applications.

Now that we’ve let you in on this exciting news, I’m curious to know what you might call such a feature? The SpiderOak Folder? The Oak Chest? Your Super Simple Folder? Here is your chance to try your hand at branding. Share with us your creativity and who knows, you may be responsible for coining the name of this additional feature…

1.4x Series Builds Released: 4x faster + Share RSS feeds

Last week we released the 1.4x series builds of SpiderOak out of beta.
Download here. Existing installs
on Windows and OS X should self-update, and the newest Linux packages are in
the apt. Most users seem to have upgraded already.

In addition to many internal improvements, users are likely to notice a huge
responsiveness and speed boost: we estmiate 4x faster than the predecessor.

There’s also several new command line options, and SpiderOak now supports
backup queues larger than physical memory, so go ahead and install on machines
with hundreds of thousands of files.

A new web feature you may have noticed: each SpiderOak share room now has an
associated RSS feed which will indicate when items in a share room are changed
or updated with newer versions. So, for example, everytime you add new
pictuers to a shared folder, or you make changes and a new version of a
document in one of your shared folders is archived, subscribers to the RSS feed
will automatically notice without you having to do anything extra.

See the complete release
notes
for more information.

SpiderOak command line options — much faster, much less memory

The newest released version of SpiderOak supports --batchmode
scheduled operation may be useful to command line users and “GUI only” people
alike. The command line version is considerably faster for most tasks (3-4x by
my estimation), and uses drastically less memory (For me on OS X, an average VM
size of 32meg, peak at 64.)

This is supported in versions 1.0.3753 and newer (released today.) On
Windows and OS X, an existing SpiderOak install should automatically upgrade
the next time it connects to the server. On Ubuntu or Debian, the apt upgrade
process should get the newest version.

Here’s what you can do (so far) from the command line:


Alan@Alan ~ $ /Applications/SpiderOak.app/Contents/MacOS/SpiderOak --help

Usage: SpiderOak basic command line usage:

Options:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  --print-selection     Print a list of selected and excluded backup items
  --reset-selection     Reset selection (but preserve excluded files)
  --exclude-file=EXCLUDE_FILE
                        Exclude the given file from the selection
  --exclude-dir=EXCLUDE_DIR
                        Exclude the given directory from the selection
  --include-dir=INCLUDE_DIR
                        Include the given directory in the selection
  --force               Do in/exclusion even if the path doesn't exist
  --headless            Never start the GUI
  --batchmode           set the config option exit_when_nothing_to_do to true

Most of these are self explanatory. --headless and
--batchmode are the ones I use most often. We’ll be adding support
for much more command line control in the future — send mail to cmdline at
spideroak.com if you want to suggest other options.

--headless just runs SpiderOak with no GUI at all. It just runs,
without printing anything to the console, so there’s no interactiveness or
activity indicators (except what’s written to the spideroak.log.) This
is suitable for use on servers or other environments where you want something
to run continuously, using as few resources as possible, without any user
input.

By the way, one of the benefits to a fault tollerant application design, is
that you don’t have to be nice to it. Feel free to force quit or kill (even
-9) at any time, and SpiderOak will rollback any uncommitted transactions, and
resume uploading or building where it left of — without corruption — the next
time you start. If you need all the available bandwidth to your first person
shooter, Skype, or you’re just trying to make your battery last as long as
possible, just killall SpiderOak and restart it when you want backups
to resume.

The next option is --batchmode (which implies --headless).
This means that SpiderOak will do all available work (i.e. scan the filesystem,
then build and upload everything in the queue, download and replay transactions
from other devices), and then exit. This is a good option for scheduled use.
You can add this to a cron job, or just run it yourself periodically whenever
you want to update your backup set.

SpiderOak is also careful not to start more than one instance of itself at a
time. For example, if you schedule SpiderOak to run in --batchmode
each night, and for the first few days, SpiderOak has so much to upload that it
does not finish before the next scheduled startup time, you don’t need to worry
about coming back to find several instances running.

In the next major release of SpiderOak, we’re restructuring the user
interface to be equally or more efficient as the command line version is now.
So, we expect the 1.5.0 series GUI versions to be several times faster than the
1.0.0 series GUI versions are today.